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Friday, April 07, 2017

The White Blues Of Urban Aspirines

This is not a collection made by an industry label . It's only the passion of URBAN ASPIRINES for the blues .


TRACKS

01. Stevie Ray Vaughan : Tin Pan Alley
02. The Rolling Stones : I Got The Blues
03. The Animals : Worried Life Blues
04. Bonnie Rait : Love Like A Man
05. Eric Clapton : Double Trouble
06. Janis Joplin : Cosmic Blues
07. Eric Burdon : Home Dream
08. John Mayall : Lying In My Bed
09. Flock : Truth
10. Led Zeppelin : Since I've Been Loving You
11. Blues Bug : Stay
12. The Nightporters : Blue And Lonesome
13. Uriah Heep : Lucy Blues


1. STEPHEN "STEVIE" RAY VAUGHAN

(October 3, 1954 – August 27, 1990) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, and record producer. In spite of a short-lived mainstream career spanning several years, he is widely considered one of the most influential guitarists in the history of music, and one of the most important figures in the revival of blues in the 1980s. AllMusic describes him as "a rocking powerhouse of a guitarist who gave blues a burst of momentum in the '80s, with influence still felt long after his tragic death."

2. THE ROLLING STONES


"I Got the Blues" is a song from the Rolling Stones' 1971 album Sticky Fingers.
Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, "I Got the Blues" is a slow-paced, bluesy song in 6/8 time. It features languid guitars with heavy influence of both blues and soul feel.
In his review, Richie Unterberger compares the Stones' take on their early influences, saying, "Musically, it's very much in the school of slow Stax ballads, by [Otis] Redding and some others, with slow reverbed guitars with a gospel feel, dignified brass, and a slow buildup of tension."[1] A notable reference point is the Otis Redding-ballad "I've Been Loving You Too Long", a song that the Stones themselves had recorded in 1965 and very similar in style and buildup.
Recorded during the months of March through May 1970, the song features Jagger on lead vocals, Richards and Mick Taylor on guitars, Bill Wyman on bass, Charlie Watts on drums, and Billy Preston on Hammond organ. Stones' recording veterans Bobby Keys and Jim Price performed on the saxophone and trumpet, respectively.

3. THE ANIMALS


The Animals are an English rhythm and blues and rock band of the 1960s, formed in Newcastle upon Tyne, during the early part of the decade. The band moved to London upon finding fame in 1964. The Animals
were known for their gritty, bluesy sound and deep-voiced frontman Eric Burdon, as exemplified by their signature song and transatlantic No. 1 hit single, "The House of the Rising Sun", as well as by hits such as "We Gotta Get out of This Place", "It's My Life", "I'm Crying" and "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood". The band balanced tough, rock-edged pop singles against rhythm and blues-orientated album material. They were known in the US as part of the British Invasion.

4. BONNIE RAIT

Bonnie Lynn Raitt (born November 8, 1949) is an American blues singer-songwriter, musician, and activist.
During the 1970s, Raitt released a series of roots-influenced albums which incorporated elements of blues, rock, folk and country.
In 1989, after several years of critical acclaim but little commercial success, she had a major hit with the album Nick of Time. The following two albums, Luck of the Draw (1991) and Longing in Their Hearts (1994), were also multimillion sellers, generating several hit singles, including "Something to Talk About", "Love Sneakin' Up on You", and the ballad "I Can't Make You Love Me" (with Bruce Hornsby on piano).
Raitt has received 10 Grammy Awards. She is listed as number 50 in Rolling Stone's list of the "100 Greatest Singers of All Time" and number 89 on their list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time".

5. ERIC CLAPTON

Eric Patrick Clapton,  (born 30 March 1945), is an English rock and blues guitarist, singer, and songwriter. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and fourth in Gibson's "Top 50 Guitarists of All Time". He was also named number five in Time magazine's list of "The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players" in 2009.

6. JANIS JOPLIN

Janis Lyn Joplin (/?d??pl?n/; January 19, 1943 – October 4, 1970) was an influential American singer of the 1960s; her raw, powerful and uninhibited singing style, combined with her turbulent and emotional lifestyle, made her one of the biggest female stars in her lifetime. She died of an accidental drug overdose in 1970, aged 27, after releasing three albums. A fourth album, Pearl, was released a little more than three months after her death, reaching number 1 on the charts.


Joplin rose to fame in 1967 during an appearance at Monterey Pop Festival, as the lead singer of the then little-known San Francisco psychedelic rock band Big Brother and the Holding Company. After releasing two albums with the band, she left Big Brother to continue as a solo artist with her own backing groups, first the Kozmic Blues Band and then the Full Tilt Boogie Band. She appeared at the Woodstock festival and the Festival Express train tour. Five singles by Joplin went into the Billboard Top 100, including "Me and Bobby McGee", which reached number 1 in March 1971. Her most popular songs include: "Piece of My Heart"; "Cry Baby"; "Down on Me"; "Ball 'n' Chain"; "Summertime"; Maybe; and "Mercedes Benz", the final song she recorded.

7. ERIC BURDON


Eric Victor Burdon (born 11 May 1941) is an English singer-songwriter and rocker best known as a member and vocalist of the R&B/rock band The Animals and the funk band War. He is also known for his deep baritone voice and aggressive stage performance. Burdon and The Animals were a component of the British Invasion of the 1960's.

He was ranked 57th in Rolling Stone's list The 100 Greatest Singers of All Time .
Burdon was lead singer of the Animals, formed during 1962 in Newcastle upon Tyne. The original band was the Alan Price Rhythm and Blues Combo, which formed in 1958; they became the Animals shortly after Burdon joined the band. The Animals combined electric blues with rock and in the USA were one of the leading bands of the British Invasion.[10] Along with the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Hollies, the Dave Clark Five, and the Kinks, the group introduced British music and fashion. Burdon's powerful voice can be heard on the Animals' singles "The House of the Rising Sun", "Sky Pilot", "Monterey", "I'm Crying", "Boom Boom", "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood", "Bring It On Home to Me", "Baby Let Me Take You Home", "It's My Life", "We Gotta Get out of This Place", "Don't Bring Me Down" and "See See Rider".

8. JOHN MAYALL

John Mayall, (born 29 November 1933) is an English blues singer, guitarist, organist and songwriter, whose musical career spans over fifty years. In the 1960s, he was the founder of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, a band which has counted among its members some of the most famous blues and blues rock musicians. They include Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Jack Bruce, John McVie, Mick Fleetwood, Mick Taylor, Don "Sugarcane" Harris, Harvey Mandel, Larry Taylor, Aynsley Dunbar, Hughie Flint, Jon Hiseman, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Andy Fraser, Johnny Almond, Walter Trout, Coco Montoya and Buddy Whittington.

Mayall spent three years in Korea for national service and, during a period of leave, he bought his first electric guitar. Back in England, he enrolled at Manchester College of Art (now part of Manchester Metropolitan University) and started playing with semi-professional bands. After graduation, he obtained a job as an art designer but continued to play with local musicians. In 1963, he opted for a full-time musical career and moved to London. His previous craft would be put to good use in the designing of covers for many of his coming albums.

9. THE FLOCK

The Flock was an American, Chicago-based jazz-rock band, that released two records on

Columbia records in 1969 (The Flock) and 1970 (Dinosaur Swamps). The Flock did not achieve the commercial success of other Columbia jazz-rock groups of the era such as Chicago and Blood Sweat & Tears, but were most notable for their inclusion of a prominent violin in their recordings. The violinist, Jerry Goodman, went on to become a member of Mahavishnu Orchestra and a solo artist.
The members at the time of their 1969 studio recording were Fred Glickstein (guitar, lead vocals), Jerry Goodman (violin), Jerry Smith (bass), Ron Karpman (drums), Rick Canoff (saxophone), Tom Webb (saxophone) and Frank Posa (trumpet).

10. LED ZEPPELIN

Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. The band's heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition as one of the progenitors of heavy metal, though their unique style drew from a wide variety of influences, including folk music.


After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group was initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with albums such as Led Zeppelin (1969), Led Zeppelin II (1969), Led Zeppelin III (1970), Led Zeppelin IV (1971), Houses of the Holy (1973), and Physical Graffiti (1975). Their fourth album, which features the track "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity.
Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation.

11. BLUES BUG

Inspired by artists such as James Brown, Kool & the Gang and Earth Wind and Fire, the B Bug has been the funkiest phenomenon in Greece since 1990. They have performed their original music as well as funk/soul's best-loved covers in Greece's most popular clubs and European Jazz Festivals.

Since 2012, because of the Greek financial crises, the nucleus of the band has moved its base to Berlin. This exciting, new lineup includes accredited musicians from all over the world, featuring Vernon D Hill from Detroit, Michigan on keyboards and vocals and Daniel El congo from Cuba on Trumpet. The original nucleus out of Athens, including lead vocalist Fotis "Potis" Tsirigotis, Teo Theodoridis on electric guitar & vocals and Leonidas Kotsis on drums is thrilled about this union of funky-funksters & can't wait to groove Berlin's booty into an atomic tailspin!

12. THE NIHGTPORTERS


This British band recorded their debut album in four days, mostly live in the studio. It's energetic bar-band R&B/rock crossover, a style that had been plumbed for decades prior to this effort, and will probably be around for as long as electric guitars are.

Consisting entirely of covers, the eight-song set is not as cliched in song choice as it could be, but neither is it that exotic, including the likes of "Hip Shake," "Rollin' and Tumblin'," "Love in Vain," and Little Walter's "Mellow Down Easy" and "Blue and Lonesome." Lead singer Ian Roberts' voice is neither that good nor colored with nuance -- qualities that are absolutely essential if you want to make your mark using both styles and material that have been around the block so often.

13. URIAH HEEP

Uriah Heep are an English rock band formed in London in 1969. Twelve of the band's albums have made it to the UK Albums Chart (Return to Fantasy reached No. 7 in 1975) while of the fifteen Billboard 200 Uriah Heep albums Demons and Wizards was the most successful (#23, 1972).

 In the late 1970s the band had massive success in Germany, where the "Lady in Black" single was a big hit. Along with Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple, Uriah Heep had become one of the top rock bands in the early 1970s.
Uriah Heep's audience declined by the 1980s, to the point where they became essentially a cult band in the United Kingdom and United States. The band maintains a significant following and performs at arena-sized venues in the Balkans, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Russia and Scandinavia. They have sold over 40 million albums worldwide with over 4 million sales in the U.S,[5] where their best-known songs include Easy Livin', The Wizard, Sweet Lorraine, and Stealin'.


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